Environmental Pollution and Health Effects of Chemicals in Developing Countries: International Collaboration Study

Research Project , Research Report 2003

Kazuhito YOKOYAMA Professor, Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo(At the time of application)
Professor, Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Mie University
(at the present)
Yasuki KOBAYASHI Professor, Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo
Mohsen VIGEH Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo
Tadashi SAKAI President, Occupational Poisoning Center, Tokyo Rosai Hospital
Shunichi ARAKI President, National Institute of Industrial Health(Research Partners)
Sasan BEHSHTI Lecturer, Department of Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences

Abstract

Environmental pollution of chemical substances has become a significant health problem in developing countries. The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship of blood lead levels with pregnancy-induced hypertension. Subjects examined were 110 pregnant women, i.e. 55 hypertensive cases, aged 27±6 (range 17 to 40) years, and the same number of age and gravidity matched normotensive controls. They were at gestational ages of 37±2.5(range 30 to 41) weeks and the study was conducted within 24 hours after delivery. In the cases, blood lead levels were 5.7±2 (2.2 to 12.6) μg/dl (0.27±0.10, range 0.11 to 0.60 μmol/l), which were significantly higher than those of control group, i.e. 4.8±1.9 (1.9 to 10.6) μg/dl (0.23±0.09, range 0.09 to 0.51 μmol/l). Our findings support a potential role of low level lead exposure as a risk factor for pregnancy hypertension among women without occupationally exposure.

Keywords:

Developing countries, environmental pollution, health effects, lead, pregnancy, hypertension, preeclampsia